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Why the Church Cares

Learn more about God's call to do justice as an integral part of Christian mission, vocation, and discipleship. Find out where the CRC stands on justice issues and the deep theology motivation those decisions.

#200WOL: Should Reformed People Even Do Evangelism?

To start us off, we're tackling an issue that seems to be problematic for many Christian young adults in 2014: how do I balance sharing my faith versus showing my faith through actions? To add a wrinkle to the question, we're taking it in a smaller slice - how to Calvinist or Reformed people, with their solid doctrine of election and their commitment to social justice, balance this out - especially in the politically-correct atmosphere of 21st century North America?

Do Justice and Faith Go Together?

Despite the variety of ways in which CRC members in Canada understand justice, there is a strong consensus that doing justice is an important – even essential – part of Christian faith. This suggests that it should be fairly easy to find points of agreement with fellow congregation members regarding how we understand justice and how justice is related to faith. These significant points of connection on the basics are reassuring when we talk about justice, and certainly provide a solid common foundation for further discussions about what justice means and how we pursue justice together.

Not to Speak is to Speak

Can I be honest with you, reader? The last thing I want to do is write an article about Gaza.

Because in the face of what has just happened there, all the words that I keep trying to string together into some kind of meaningful or helpful thought seem superfluous, empty, and trite.

Listing the numbers also won’t do, as horrifying as they are.

2,168 people, killed.

521 children, killed.

12,000 people, injured.

500,000 people, displaced.

On the benefits of fear

Fear, my dear Schimmel, is our friend. Few things stop the transition of theology to praxis quite as effectively as fear. I suppose we could consider pride its cousin, for they work together wonderfully for us. 

70% of Farm Workers Undocumented

This is why I am frustrated about the U.S. immigration debates. When I work in agriculture it’s noble–farmers feeding the world–but immigrants doing the exact same work are told to “get in line,” and as real farmers know, there is no line.

On Relationships with Outsiders

Author's note: The following is part of a satirical series modeled on the Screwtape Letters. The writer of these letters is training an underling in the art of keeping justice out of discipleship, and, eventually, the life of the church.

My dear Schimmel, I've spent a great deal of time teaching you the danger of relationship with "the other". Yet it is so important to our work I will instruct you again. You've been working on Jason, haven't you? I see you've kept him fairly isolated, but I think he may still be at risk.

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Churches Commit to Climate Justice

Desmond Tutu is certainly no stranger to the pursuit of justice.

The South African Anglican Archbishop Emeritus and Nobel Laureate was in Canada in early June at the invitation of the Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation.

Best known for his part in the anti-apartheid struggle in his native South Africa, Tutu referred to climate change as “the moral struggle that will define this time.” "The oilsands,” he said, “are emblematic of an era of high carbon and high-risk fuels that must end if we are committed to a safer climate."

The Clean Power Plan: Why it Matters

There’s a good chance that, at some point in the last few days, you’ve heard something about the Environmental Protection Agency or the Clean Power Plan.

Rebuke Your Neighbor

Last year, the Rana Plaza garment factory suddenly collapsed, killing more than 1,100 workers and injuring around 2,500. It was the deadliest such disaster in the history of the garment industry. To mark the anniversary of this horrific event, Rev. Thyra VanKeeken wrote this short reflection: 

Transformed by a Stranger

Not every pastor would say to his congregation, “And then I felt stupid, and I had to ask his forgiveness,” but Pastor Dave Beelen did. On August 25, 2013, Pastor Beelen of Madison Square CRC began his sermon with a confession: a confession of his misjudgement, which resulted in a mistake.

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