Back to Top

Race

Learn more on the Office of Race Relations website.

What to Say to Kids about Pilgrims and Indians

My kindergartener came home excited this weekend -- he’d gotten a free book, one that he could keep! He wanted to read it right away.

As soon as I saw the book, I tried to deflect. “Maybe later, honey.” Nope! Now!

“Wouldn’t you like to find a different book? There a whole bunch of new ones from the library on the table.” Nope! This one! The Indian one.

It’s Thanksgiving season in the United States -- when many of our kids will come home with construction paper head-dresses and mythology about a peaceful dinner between "Pilgrims and Indians."

Pro-Life series: Shalom-seeking

What this pro-life series has taught me is that the CRCNA is deeply, unapologetically pro-life. 

Pro-Life series: Indigenous People

“Sometimes Native people want to be white. Tell them that they’re made in God’s image.” That’s what an Indigenous elder told a friend of mine when she asked what she should tell Church people about Indigenous peoples. Violet, an elder among the Carrier people of northern British Columbia, is naming and challenging the internalized racism faced by Indigenous peoples across North America today. When the image of God is diminished in one it is diminished in all of us – and life and shalom are affected.

The Blanket Exercise- Learning to Hear a Different Story

I have participated in the Blanket Exercise several times and each time I have heard people, of all backgrounds, say “I never knew. Nobody ever told me this.” How we tell the story matters and the Blanket Exercise gives us the opportunity to learn a more complete story.

Racial Justice in the Reading Classroom

After noticing that some of the books we grew up reading were less than inclusive and made for attitudes about our neighbors that had to be unlearned, we started wondering...how do parents and educators find books that both explicitly and implicitly support a cornerstone of our theology--that all people are made in the image of God? We've asked a number of justice-minded parents and educators for their thoughts. Today we hear from Laura Veenema, a literacy tutor and mom in Chicago. 

Finding Justice-Minded Books for Kids- Part 3

Injustices are prevalent first in what or who is NOT being included in the content and second in HOW marginalized groups are presented.

Finding Justice-Minded Books for Kids- Part 2

Books that are imaginative and creative also help our kids develop a sense of wonder, curiosity, and possibility. These are helpful traits when imagining what a world that is different than the status quo could be like, an important aspect of working for justice.

Finding Justice-Minded Books for Kids

Depending on where you live, the new school year is either quickly approaching or has already begun! After noticing that some of the books we grew up reading were less than inclusive and made for attitudes about our neighbors that had to be unlearned, we started wondering...how do parents and educators find books that both explicitly and implicitly support a cornerstone of our theology--that all people are made in the image of God? We've asked a number of justice-minded parents and educators for their thoughts.

Microaggressions: Who Gets to Belong?

Over the course of the past couple of years, I have been introduced to the term “microaggression.” I think I have known what microaggressions are for years, but hadn’t had the right word for them until recently. The term “microaggression” refers to an unconscious discrimination or degradation of a person related to their gender, race, ability, income or sexual identity.

Tags: 

Charleston and Subtle Canadian Racism

How do I talk to my children about racism in light of Charleston? I thought it would be easy for me to answer as I do not shy away from real topics with my children. However, I couldn’t come up with something for this blog. I asked my children if I ever talked with them about racism and they looked at me with questions in their eyes and responded, “no”. I talked about the blog with my colleague and told her I was having trouble with this assignment and I couldn’t even answer the questions. I realized that perhaps I didn’t talk with my children about overt racism because of the sheer violenc

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Race