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New Opportunities

Stay informed on important legislation, learn about emerging justice areas, and find networks to plug in to.

MMIW: One Indigenous Woman's Perspective

These are the kinds of conversations Aboriginal women are having. It is not normal and shouldn’t be routine. It is scary but necessary. Do other women have to have these conversations?

Praying for #Ferguson

The events in Ferguson, Missouri have captivated the world of social media this week. On Saturday afternoon, eighteen year-old Michael Brown was shot and killed by police while walking home with a friend. A candlelight vigil to remember Brown turned violent on Sunday, leading to looting and more than thirty arrests. Monday and Tuesday saw tensions rise as residents gathered for peaceful demonstrations, demanding the officer’s name be released and details about the incident be made public.

Weeping, Rejoicing, and Praying for Refugee Healthcare

"A country is judged by how it treats its most vulnerable." Although the source of this oft-mentioned quote is up for debate, it is undoubtedly a powerful statement that stands in judgment of our nation.

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First Nations Education: Beyond Pithy Headlines

This morning a radio announcer went with a pithy headline: "Yesterday First Nations Chiefs Left $1.9 Billion on the Table."

Rally to Free Lulu

This is the third year in a row that Lulu has celebrated her birthday in sanctuary.  Almost two and a half years ago, Lulu and her parents saw no other option but to move into a Toronto church when they were threatened with deportation to Hungary.

Belle's Story

About a year ago, I met a woman named Belle, who was trying to leave prostitution. As we began to form a friendship she began to tell me her story. Though the details differ, her story echoes those of other women who have survived prostitution. Despite being smart, funny, resilient, courageous, loving, and sensitive, Belle has not yet been able to find a way out of addiction and abusive relationships. Though I’ve worked in one way or another with people on the margins my entire adult life, I experienced a profound awareness of Christ’s presence as this woman and I formed a friendship.

Fast for Families

For centuries, Christians have been fending off a certain heresy that the early church tried to put away– a heresy called Gnosticism that said that bodies and souls are separate, and not equal. This lie tells us God cares about our spiritual lives, but not about our physical lives.

Scripture tells us that we are whole people – body, spirit, heart, mind – and that all of this is what makes us image-bearers of God himself. God is not interested in just our souls. For God, dualities like that don’t exist. We are whole people – body and soul together.

Win a Trip to a Historic Aboriginal Justice Conference

Come see what God is doing! The two winners of the first prize (one Canadian and one American) will win a trip to Edmonton, Canada for the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. If you’re between the ages of 18 and 30, you’re invited to submit a 400-800 word reflection or mixed media contribution (eg. spoken word video, Prezi presentation, poem) on one or more of the following questions to the judges panel through drowaan@crcna.org before February 21.

Scholarships for 2014 Justice Conference

This winter, World Renew and the OSJ are able to offer up to 20 scholarships towards the registration cost of The Justice Conference, happening in Los Angeles, Friday evening February 21 through February 22. If you would like to apply for a scholarship to attend this conference let us know by filling out this application by January 20.

Review: Tiny Dancer by Anthony Flacco

“I had to admit I harbored the rudiments of racism, an unconscious attitude that I fight daily, but that none of us can totally escape,” writes Mary Pipher in her book The Middle of Everywhere. How true! As refugee committees we discuss who to sponsor even though in our mission statement we express the desire to help anyone from anywhere. We worry if our country will stay ‘Christian’ and be trouble free. We stereotype and show our fear of strangers especially those coming from Muslim nations, I would argue, because of their aptitude for violence and their notorious low value on females.

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