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Ideas for Action

Take action. Find concrete ways to live justly, engage your congregation, and advocate for change.

Days of Prayer and Action for Colombia

Every day at five am in the small rural community of Basurú, on Colombia’s Pacific Coast, a group from the local Mennonite church gathers to broadcast the events of the day. Using a microphone connected to megaphones hoisted high above the community on bamboo poles, the technology may be archaic but the messages are not. The only way to reach the community is by boat on the San Juan river; access to local news is a way to keep the community connected and informed of what is going on in the world around them.

10 Ways to Connect with the Truth and Reconciliation Commission

If you won a court case for horrendous abuse, what would you demand? Money? Indigenous peoples in Canada asked for a chance to tell their stories of residential schools to the nation, to teach others about a part of our history that often doesn’t get much space in the history textbooks. (If you’re American, you’re not off the hook. Our countries share a very similar story about residential schools.)

How to Pray for a Revolution

When Egypt gathered in Cairo’s Tahrir Square in January 2011, I prayed that there would be real change in that country. I prayed that Egyptians would be freed from their bondage beneath the thumb of dictatorship, poverty, and social injustice.

When uprisings began in Yemen and Libya, I prayed that the reformers would win. When bombs went off and barricades rose and protestors marched, I prayed that the underdogs would win out against their overlords. When the weak stood up to the strong, I prayed.

Good Enough

This is one of my favorite passages from Nicholas Wolterstorff. I first appreciated its significance on July 4, 2011, when I was living in Colombia, South America, participating in the Mennonite Central Committee’s Seed program. We were a mix of people from all the Americas: Peru, Colombia, Mexico, US, and Canada. On American Independence Day, with the smell of brownies in the oven and Taylor Swift playing in the background, we came together—not to celebrate our country, but to recognize where we came from.

Human Trafficking: What we can do about it

There were five things that I took away from the conference that I can do. I’ll go through them one-by-one and elaborate.

Meeting the Neighbours

We just moved – packed up all we own and migrated across the Rockies and across the Georgia Strait. We’re now in a town that shares borders with two reserves. I admit that I don’t know a great deal about these neighbours. That’s not entirely true; at a certain level, I’ve learned a great deal. I know that they are the first residents of this land. I know that through a series of treaties and promises and no shortage of sneakiness and partial truths, we managed to squeeze them onto small reserves.

Why I Gave Up Chocolate

It was this speaker that changed how I saw chocolate. I don’t remember much about him except that he had a couple tattoos and that he wore a Boston Bruins jersey one day. I do, however, remember his talk one day on why Christians should be paying the extra bucks for fair trade. He talked a lot about clothing, which is always brought up when talking about fair trade, but then talked about a fair trade issue I hadn’t heard of before: chocolate.

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Invite Your Church to Pray About Immigration

Reforming the system may take months, but reforming our hearts to care about the "stranger in our gates" may take much longer. Start now.

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